If you could make only one change this year.

Brain based engagement

If you could make only one change this year (seriously, I do mean just one), which change would you make? Of course, the answer depends on what you already do well.

When I first started teaching, no one was talking about the effect sizes of what we did in the classroom. But, in retrospect, my trial and error teaching processes led me to implement some of the highest effect size strategies in all education.

This month you will learn a simple, easy-to-implement strategy that will pay massive dividends ALL year long. In fact, today’s research shows that it is an absolute blockbuster for student learning. (more…)

7 Changes You Can Make to Save Your Life from Cancer

Life Strategies to beat cancer

You or a family member may be concerned about the “big two” killers (cancer and Alzheimer’s.) This month we focus on cancer and the July issue will be on Alzheimer’s.

By the way, every year these suggestions get so many rave reviews that they are re-sent, forwarded and “re-gifted.”  Feel free to do so yourself.

DISCLAIMER: Before I begin any comments about health, I am required by law to make a disclaimer: “The following comments are not meant to diagnose or treat any disease, nor have they been approved by the FDA.” (By the way, an oncologist would have to make the same disclaimer.)

The Research

Many have heard that there is some randomness to getting cancer. A study got quite a bit of publicity when it said the majority of cancer is just “bad luck” (Tomasetti & Vogelstein, 2015). But a careful reading of the study showed they used a very select few tissue samples (31), and it excludes the most common cancers like breast and prostate cancers. The study is too small to generalize their data.

Many highly renowned researchers have already denounced the study. Do not buy into this; it was not generalizable science. Truthfully, there is some bad luck, but not much. The majority of all cancers are preventable. In fact, the heritability of most cancers is between 5 and 10%. That’s why you want to focus on environmental factors.

If you think the “heritability” percentages are WAY too low, consider this… (more…)

… about your emotional weight

How much “weight” do you carry every day?

Isn’t work challenging enough without adding weight?

You may be thinking, “What kind of nerve does Eric have, talking about my weight?”

Actually, this post is NOT about the extra pounds on your frame. (After all, you likely already know that every 10 pounds of weight loss equals 40 pounds of added pressure OFF your knees. Put it differently, for each pound of body weight lost, there is a 4-pound reduction in knee joint stress among overweight and obese people with osteoarthritis of the knee.) (more…)

Help Your Brain Make Better Decisions: Cognitive Skill Building for ALL of Us

We have all begun a new calendar year. For some, there is already stress and more of the same challenges from last year. But this post has answers for you. This is all about using something FREE to help your brain in the decision-making process. It works for you, your colleagues, your family and your students.

By the way, over a year’s time, what is it worth to you to make just ONE better decision a day? (more…)

How to Boost Engagement and Effort in 3 Simple Steps (Part 3 of 4)

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Starting up after the holidays can be a bit of a challenge. But this month’s newsletter has answers for you. This will be the 3rd of a four-part series on the real “how to” for student engagement and effort. (more…)

Boost Student Engagement and Effort in 6 Simple Steps

student engagement brain-based

You may not have big challenges getting your students to work hard in school, but many of your colleagues DO have a tough time. At least that’s what they tell me! This is the first of a 4-part series on the real “how to” for student engagement and effort.

The first six steps you should know about are… (more…)

Can Teachers Move Students Of Poverty To Middle Or Upper Class?

tt-podcast-art-eric-jensen

Drew Perkins talks with author Eric Jensen about his book, Poor Students, Rich Teaching: Mindsets for Change (Raising Achievement for Youth at Risk) and how he believes teachers can change their mindsets to help students of poverty move to the middle or upper class.

Jumpstarting Learning for Children in Poverty

Contrary to popular belief, DNA is not a child’s destiny. IQ is not fixed. Cognitive skills can change. This is critically important in K-12 schools because of the poverty gap — the difference between a child’s chronological age and developmental age.

In a healthy environment, a child’s developmental age will match his or her chronological age. In a high-risk environment, research shows that while a child’s chronological age is 5 years old, his or her developmental age is closer to 3 years old. This has a huge impact on school readiness and performance.

Today, 51 percent of all students in U.S. public schools are poor. Our public education system is designed to help students achieve a year of academic growth in a school year. For economically disadvantaged children, that’s a problem. (more…)

You Can Be Running Your Own Brain Even Better…

Brain Based Teaching 

Discover the Hidden “Map” of Your Emotions

You may not know this man’s name, yet you see the results of his work all the time. His work shows up when you go through a TSA security line at the airport. His work shows up in the movie you loved watching (“Inside Out” by Disney/Pixar) and his work shows up in the classroom where you can get an insight into student behaviors. He has influenced the Dali Lama and met with him many times.

The one researcher you should know about is…

The Research

The one researcher you should know about is Dr. Paul Ekman. Why?

In the classroom, teachers often get upset with a student’s behavior. Inappropriate behaviors will likely puzzle, frustrate, or irritate teachers who have less experience teaching students raised differently than themselves. Still, it’s important to avoid labeling, demeaning, or blaming students. Truth is, many students simply do NOT know HOW to behave. (more…)

Facilitating change within schools

WALKERTOWN, N.C. — School isn’t in session yet, but hundreds of educators with the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School System are already hard at work. Everyone gathered at Walkertown High School is participating in the 2nd Annual Collaborative Learning Conference.

Keynote Speaker Eric Jensen’s message focused on facilitating change within schools and helping the most vulnerable population-students living in poverty- succeed. “My message to teachers is you have far more influence than you think you do, and working with students from poverty can actually be meaningful and even joyful once you have the skillset that can make it all happen,” Jensen said.

“Kids really learn when you bring it to life for them,” Craps said. “We spend so much time teaching the outside world from the inside and being immersed in it for 9 days really helped me realize that I need to take my students outside into the natural world to let them learn about what`s out there, and to explore and let them be curious.”

1,200 staff members attended the conference over a two-day period in early August.

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